35 Different Types of Coneflowers For Your Garden (2022)

Coneflowers have nine species and 60-100 varieties with two species considered endangered. All coneflower varieties have the same daisy-like appearance.

35 Different Types of Coneflowers For Your Garden (1)

Coneflowers have nine species and 60-100 varieties with two species considered endangered. All coneflower varieties have the same daisy-like appearance. They’re native to the US with Native Americans using them as herbal remedies for toothaches, sore throats, snakebites and blood poisoning. Today they’re used as supplements to boost the immune system and prevent common colds.

Coneflowers produce the unique phenomenon called allelopathy which means it can emit chemicals that would prevent the growth of other competing plants.

Purple Coneflower

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Also known as the Echinacea purpurea Pow Wow® Wild Berry, it is a beautiful perennial that grows up to 20 inches in height and does best with full sun and partial shade. The purple petals are eye-catching and attract butterflies and bees. It can be grown even in drought conditions and is resistant to deer. If you make sure that the soil is well-drained, the Purple Coneflower is perfect for large containers, even those that are over three gallons in size. The regular Echinacea purpurea grows up to three feet in height and has similar blooms, except with petals that droop slightly downward. Both varieties are striking and very fragrant, making them very popular indeed.

White Coneflower

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Known as Echinacea purpurea White Swan, it has beautiful white petals and a vibrant gold-yellow center. It can grow up to four feet in height and attracts bees, butterflies, and birds. As long as you deadhead the flowers, it is a repeat bloomer and this type of coneflower also can be used as a medicinal herb. It grows well in large pots and its white petals droop slightly, giving it an elegant look.

Echinacea Hot Papaya

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This coneflower is bright red-orange in color with red-orange centers. It consists of both shorter petals around the center and petals that droop underneath the center, giving it a very full look. The Hot Papaya is very fragrant, it grows up to 32 inches in height, and butterflies love it.

Echinacea Cheyenne Spirit

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(Video) Growing ConeFlowers

These flowers are a beautiful gold color and have large centers consisting of large elegant-looking spikes. They grow up to 32 inches in height and are deer-resistant. They are attractive to butterflies and can also come in colors that include red, purple, pink, orange, and even cream. The flowers are very showy and fragrant and are therefore very popular among flower lovers.

Echinacea Tomato Soup

The Tomato Soup variety is bright red in color and very fragrant. They grow to 32 inches in height and have sparse petals and a wide, thick center. They are perfect for containers that hold three or more gallons and butterflies love them. Moreover, they look beautiful in bouquets and vases and although they will not come true from seed, the flowers can be divided in order to produce additional blooms.

Echinacea Hot Summer

One of the things that makes this variety so unique is the various colors that it can come in within the same bloom, which include yellow, red, and orange. They have sparse but elegant petals and dark centers and they grow up to four feet tall. The Hot Summer variety grows throughout the summer into early fall and is attractive to butterflies. Although they don’t need to be deadheaded, they often produce additional, constantly changing colors if you follow this procedure. They do best in zones 4 and upward and they are beautiful in bouquets.

Echinacea Pink Double Delight

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These flowers’ beautiful pink petals are showy, fragrant, and perfect as cut flowers. They grow up to 26 inches in height and are deer-resistant. Butterflies love them and they also look great in extra-large containers and pots, including those that are three gallons or larger. They have several layers of petals and a slightly brown center, which makes the petals even more noticeable.

Echinacea purpurea Magnus

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This is another purple coneflower and they are perfect for zones 3-9. They grow up to three feet in height and they like soil that is not too wet, even slightly dry. The flowers have leaves that are herbaceous and they are attractive to bees, butterflies, and birds. Their petals are light or rose-pink in color and they are perfect for use as either cut or dried flowers. The Magnus does best if divided in early Spring and if placed in pots, they need excellent drainage.

Echinacea purpurea Coconut Lime

The Coconut Lime’s petals are whitish-yellow and droop around the center, which is large, wide, and lime green in color. The flowers are deer-resistant and very tolerant of dry conditions, even droughts. Butterflies love them and they are very striking and fragrant. They grow up to 30 inches in height and do best in zones 5 and higher.

Echinacea Big Sky™ Harvest Moon

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Yellow or golden-yellow in color, this flower has sparse petals and a wide center that contains small spikes. They grow up to two feet in height and are loved by butterflies. Perfect for large pots and as cut flowers, the Harvest Moon does best in full sun and partial shade and its aroma is magnificent.

Echinacea tennesseensis

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Also called the Tennessee Coneflower, it can grow up to two feet high and has beautiful pink petals and a dark center. One of the unique aspects of growing these kinds of flowers is that they grow well in almost all conditions, including full or partial shade. They are showy and fragrant and they are suitable as annuals. The flowers have also won a few international flower awards.

Echinacea purpurea Pow Wow® White

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With beautiful drooping white petals and a large, wide center, these flowers are quite striking, and they do best in zones 3 or higher. They grow up to two feet in height and do well even in extra-dry conditions. Butterflies, bees, and birds love them and they look amazing in extra-large containers.

Echinacea Big Sky™ Summer Sky

A beautiful peach-colored flower that grows up to two feet in height and is loved by butterflies, it looks beautiful in large containers and as cut flowers and its fragrance is wonderful. The Summer Sky is deer-resistant, it grows best in zones 3 or higher, and you can divide it in order to grow additional plants.

Echinacea Flame Thrower

The Flame Thrower has sparse petals that are orange or yellow in color and a beautiful center with spikes. They grow unusually large, usually up to 40 inches in height, and are deer-resistant. They are also attractive to butterflies, have a wonderful aroma, and look great in a bouquet or vase.

Echinacea Fatal Attraction

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These flowers have beautiful, eye-catching purple or pink petals and stems that are deep purple. They grow up to 28 inches high and look fantastic in large containers. Their centers are unusually wide, making the petals look short but elegant, and they are loved by butterflies of all kinds.

Echinacea purpurea Rubinstern

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The Rubinstern has beautiful pink or purple petals and a center that is unusually large and thick. The petals droop slightly, giving it a very unique look, and it can grow up to three feet high. You can divide it to grow additional plants and it is deer-resistant and tolerant of droughts. It is also attractive to birds, butterflies, and bees and has a great aroma.

Echinacea Big Sky™ Sundown

With sparse, orange petals and a dark, large center, the Sundown has herbaceous leaves and grows up to three feet high. It is also used as an erosion control method, which makes it quite unique, and is loved by butterflies, bees, and birds. Although the flower will not come true from seed, you can divide it to produce additional plants and it is beautiful when placed in large containers, thanks in part to its stunning look.

Echinacea Sombrero Salsa Red

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(Video) Coneflower care and growing!

As the name suggests, these flowers have petals that are a striking, eye-catching red and centers that are dark as well. They grow up to two feet in height, are resistant to deer, and grow best when given excellent drainage. They look spectacular in containers and as cut flowers and butterflies are attracted to them.

Echinacea paradoxa

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Also called the Yellow Coneflower, this flower consists of long, drooping yellow petals and a center that is large and thick. They grow to an impressive three feet, and they can be successfully grown in zones 3-10. The flower will naturalize and it looks great in large containers and as cut flowers. It is an eye-catching perennial that prefers full sun and partial shade.

Echinacea Merlot

Another Purple Coneflower, the Merlot consists of purple or red petals that look a little shorter than other coneflowers because of its extra-large and extra-wide center. It is loved by butterflies and grows up to 30 feet in height. The Merlot looks great in containers and in bouquets and they are resistant to deer.

Echinacea Big Sky™ Sunrise

With delicate yellow petals and a greenish-brown center, the Sunrise is eye-catching and grows to 18 inches in height. It does not come true from seed but instead requires dividing it to get additional plants. It is attractive to butterflies. The Sunrise looks great in vases and in large containers, making it truly versatile.

Echinacea purpurea Doppelganger

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Also known as the Eastern Purple Coneflower, its beautiful dark- and light-pink petals are slightly dense and attractive to butterflies. The flower can grow even in dry conditions and is deer-resistant. Various insects pollinate the plant and it looks great in vases and even in large containers.

Echinacea purpurea Ruby Giant

These beautiful flowers grow up to three feet high and have purple or red petals that are sparse but long. They are resistant to deer and look great as cut flowers. The Ruby Giant is very fragrant and grows from summer to early Fall. Because of their beauty, they also look great in large containers.

Echinacea pallida

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Also called the Pale Purple Coneflower, this flower has petals that are purple, pink, or white in color and are very sparse and droopy. Their centers are wide and thick and they can grow up to three feet in height. Best when grown in zones 3-10, the Pale Purple Coneflower will naturalize and is attractive to butterflies and bees. They are showy and fragrant and are pollinated by several different types of insects.

Echinacea Ferris Wheel

Growing from midsummer until the first frost, this flower has sparse, ruffled petals, usually white in color, that have tips which resemble additional petals. They are a hardy flower that grows great in zones 4-9 and they can grow up to three feet in height. They are truly unique and eye-catching, mainly due to the unique tips of the petals.

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Echinacea Maui Sunshine

Great for zones 4-9, the Maui Sunshine has striking golden-yellow petals and a large, thick gold center. Just shy of two feet in height, these flowers seem to take on a unique glow when you grow them in your garden, standing out among the other flower types.

Echinacea purpurea Double Decker

Perfect for zones 3-8, the Double Decker contains petals attached to the top of its center and down below, giving them a two-tiered look. Eye-catching at roughly 40 inches high and in colors such as purplish-pink, the Double Decker is a beautiful, very unique addition to anyone’s garden.

Echinacea purpurea Mac ’n’ Cheese

As its name suggests, these flowers have petals that are cheese-colored and can get up to 4.5 inches in width. They only grow to 26 inches in height but are hardy flowers that do great in zones 4-9. Many gardeners plant them alongside the Tomato Soup variety for a striking contrast in the garden.

Echinacea purpurea Adam Saul

Dark-pink, drooping petals surround a beautiful orange cone and they can produce over 100 blooms per year. Great for zones 4-9, the Adam Saul variety is extra fragrant and is also known as Crazy Pink. They are definitely an eye-catcher in anyone’s garden, regardless of what is surrounding them.

Echinacea purpurea Green Jewel

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These flowers are characterized by their light green petals and dark green center that contains a thin yellow stripe around it. They grow best in zones 3-8 and get up to two feet in height. They are extra attractive when placed next to flowers and foliage that are dark in color and their aroma is second to none.

Echinacea purpurea Milkshake

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The Milkshake is a little unique in its appearance, consisting of double yellow cones and drooping petals in various shades of French vanilla. They can grow up to 30 inches tall and flower in midsummer, re-blooming in the fall. They also do best when grown in zones 3-9.

Echinacea purpurea Pink Poodle

With a look that is similar to zinnias, these coneflowers have dense, medium- to dark-pink petals and yellow centers. The early blooms may seem a little dysfunctional but once their blooms are full and the garden is more established, the look is quite extraordinary. They are sturdy, have beautiful stems, and they grow up to 32 inches in height. They are a truly unique, noticeable flower

Echinacea Quills and Thrills

These sparse, lavender-pink petals resemble quills and have tips that are wider than the rest of the petal. With unusually large, dark orange cones, they can grow up to three feet in height and look absolutely stunning as part of a bouquet.

Echinacea purpurea Purity

With beautiful orange cones and elegant white petals, the Purity can grow as many as 25 flowers per season and their blooms can be as wide as 4.5 inches. Some reblooming can occur in the fall and they can grow as high as 26 inches.

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Echinacea purpurea Marmalade

As its name implies, this orange-gold flower resembles orange marmalade and has both short and drooping tangerine petals and light-green centers. They grow as high as 30 inches tall and do best in zones 4-9.

FAQs

What are the hardiest coneflowers? ›

A native North American plant indigenous to the central plains, Echinacea purpurea is virtually indestructible.

What month is best to plant coneflowers? ›

When to Plant Coneflowers. The best time to plant coneflowers is in the spring, when all danger of frost has passed. You can also plant in early fall. Just be sure your new plants have at least 6 weeks to establish roots before the first expected frost or they might not come back in the spring.

What is the longest blooming coneflower? ›

These are the Longest Blooming Perennials in my Garden (I Tracked Them All Year)
Common NameBotanical NameWeeks in Bloom
Purple ConeflowerEchinacea purpurea10
Coreopsis 'Early Sunrise'Coreopsis grandiflora12+
Crape Myrtle 'Black Diamond Pure White'Lagerstroemia indica11
Daylily 'Fragrant Returns'Hemerocallis12*
9 more rows
Nov 24, 2021

How many years do coneflowers live? ›

In the wild, a single plant can live up to 40 years. In the garden, they are best when divided every 4 years.

How many types of coneflowers are there? ›

Coneflower

Will coneflowers spread? ›

Mulch plants with compost at the time of planting. Spacing: Coneflowers are clumping plants. One plant will tend to get larger, but it will not spread and overtake the garden via roots or rhizomes.

How close together can I plant coneflowers? ›

How to Plant Coneflowers. Plant coneflowers about 1 to 3 feet apart, depending on the mature size of the variety. If planting from a pot, dig a hole about twice the pot's diameter. Set the plant so that the root ball is level with the soil surface.

Do hummingbirds like coneflowers? ›

The purple coneflower (echinacea) is a tough, drought-tolerant, beautiful perennial that thrives in the environment of this area. In addition, the colorful plant attracts butterflies, bees and hummingbirds.

Should coneflowers be planted in groups? ›

Plant the coneflowers together in groups of colors, not scattered and mixed with different colors. For example, place white-flowered Fragrant Angel coneflowers (Echinacea purpurea 'Fragrant Angel') next to the pink-purple Magnus coneflower (Echinacea purpurea 'Magnus'), which has orange highlights on the center tips.

How do you keep coneflowers blooming? ›

Deadheading your coneflowers in the summer entails cutting flowers that have ended their bloom. Deadheading is often done to keep the plant looking tidy, to prevent spreading by seed, and to encourage more blooms on the plant.

Should I cut back my coneflowers in the fall? ›

Cut coneflowers down in the fall as an aesthetic choice.

Each fall, your coneflower plants will die off, leaving behind brown stems and wilted flowers. Some gardeners prefer pruning the flower at this stage to keep their yard looking well-groomed.

Is Black Eyed Susan a coneflower? ›

Yellow coneflower, or black-eyed Susan, is -- like all the members of this genus -- a native American wildflower. The genus for coneflowers is named in honor of Olaf Rudbeck and his son, both professors of botany.

What is the difference between coneflower and Echinacea? ›

Echinacea is one of the three different genera known as coneflowers. Some well-known species in the Echinacea genus include Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea. Members of the Echinacea species are known by their common name, purple coneflowers, or (confusingly) just coneflowers.

Where do coneflowers grow best? ›

"Most coneflowers will do best in USDA zones three to nine." Just make sure you plant them somewhere they'll see plenty of light. "Coneflowers perform best in full sun (at least six hours per day) and loose, well-drained soil, but will also tolerate heavy clay and even shallow, rocky soils with aplomb," says Quindoy.

What animals eat coneflowers? ›

Coneflowers are often considered deer resistant, but what other animals will eat them? If something has been nibbling on your plants, and you can easily rule out deer, rabbits are the most likely culprit. Rabbits will happily snack on the young stems and leaves of coneflowers.

How do you winterize coneflowers? ›

Coneflower (Echinacea) – Leave the seed heads up in winter for wildlife and then trim the stems to the basal foliage and simply clean up the remaining foliage in spring. Penstemon (Penstemon digitalis) – Prune down to basal foliage in fall.

Do slugs eat Echinacea? ›

Ducks: These birds love slugs and snails and are one of the best controls. Chickens like them as well, but do more damage to crops. Toads, snakes, birds and Ground Beetles (probably the most important) all kill slugs and snails.

How many different colors of coneflowers are there? ›

Coneflower Plant Features

Coneflower colors include pink, red, orange, white, and yellow. Most varieties have large single-petaled blooms, but double- and triple-flowered types are also available. Coneflowers grow 18 to 36 inches tall and are deer resistant. Hardy from zones 3-8.

What color is Cheyenne Spirit coneflower? ›

The plants of Echinacea 'Cheyenne Spirit' (Cheyenne Spirit Coneflower) provide a mix of flower colors including gold, scarlet, orange, rose-red, cream, purple and yellow. Grown from seed, 'Cheyenne Spirit' has improved vigor over other orange, yellow and red flowered varieties propagated from tissue culture.

Are there short varieties of coneflowers? ›

Echinacea purpurea 'little Annie' – This is one of the shortest coneflowers, reaching only 6-10 inches tall when in full bloom. Echinacea purpurea 'Pixie Meadowbrite' – A mid size variety that grows 1-2 feet tall.

Will coneflowers come back every year? ›

Yes, echinacea will come back every year and very often in the strangest of places as they are such prolific self seeders. Echinacea is a hardy perennial that survives very cold winters. Plants become dormant in winter and re-emerge in spring, when you should cut them back for best results in the summer.

Do coneflowers need a lot of water? ›

Watering: Tolerant of drought, but does best in average, dry to medium moisture. Water regularly, but let soil dry out in between. Coneflowers need at least an inch of water weekly. Propagation: Divide clumps when crowded, about every 4 years.

What time of year do you plant coneflower seeds? ›

Coneflowers germinate readily when sown directly in the garden bed. Wait to plant until the soil temperature has warmed to 65 F in spring or early summer to ensure best germination. You can also sow outdoors later in the season, up to two months before the first expected fall frost.

Are cone flowers low maintenance? ›

Coneflowers

Coneflowers, or echinacea, are quickly becoming my favourite perennial plant. They have a long blooming period, from summer through fall, and require virtually no maintenance. The clumps get bigger each year, with more flowers to fill your garden.

Can you overwater coneflowers? ›

Overwatering is as damaging to coneflowers as underwatering. If the soil feels muddy, soggy or sticky, hold off on irrigation until the soil has dried out. Coneflowers don't require irrigation during the dormant or semidormant winter months, even when the foliage remains green in mild climates.

Should you Deadhead Echinacea? ›

So when asked about deadheading Echinacea plants, I usually recommend only deadheading spent blooms through the blooming period to keep the plant looking beautiful, but leaving spent flowers in late summer-winter for the birds. You can also deadhead Echinacea to prevent it from reseeding itself all over the garden.

Are coneflowers Hardy? ›

Coneflowers are quintessential prairie plants. Native to eastern North America, they are hardy, drought-tolerant, long-blooming, and cultivated in an ever-widening range of colors. It's hard to find a garden without at least one variety of the bloom.

Should you deadhead coneflowers? ›

Deadheading your coneflowers in the summer entails cutting flowers that have ended their bloom. Deadheading is often done to keep the plant looking tidy, to prevent spreading by seed, and to encourage more blooms on the plant.

Do coneflowers spread? ›

Spacing: Coneflowers are clumping plants. One plant will tend to get larger, but it will not spread and overtake the garden via roots or rhizomes.

Which type of Echinacea is best? ›

Echinacea is a coneflower used to increase the number of white blood cells. Among the three most popular types of echinacea, David Winston, RH (AHG), a registered herbalist, recommends taking the strongest, Echinacea angustifolia, alone or in combination with Echinacea purpurea and/or Echinacea pallida.

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